Monthly Archives: April 2015

Keep your thoughts positive, because you

Keep your thoughts positive, because your thoughts become your words.
Keep your words positive, because your words become your behavior.
Keep your behavior positive, because your behavior become your habits.
Keep your habits positive, because your habits become your values.
Keep your values positive, because your values become your destiny.
MAHATMA GANDHI
You want to change organisational culture, this is one way.
You want to change the world?, One word at a time.

Bullying in one workplace cost..$$$$

Stop gary tremolada Frontline Management experts

The NSW Court of Appeal recently held a company to be vicariously liable (imposes responsibility upon one person for the failure of another, with whom the person has a special relationship (such as parent and child, employer and employee, or owner of vehicle and driver), to exercise such care as a reasonably prudent person would use under similar circumstances) for the harassment and extreme bullying perpetrated on a labour hire employee by its Fire and Safety Officer.  The trial judge had found that the perpetrator’s conduct was “so brutal, demeaning and unrelenting that it was reasonably foreseeable that, if continued for a significant period of time … it would be likely to cause significant, recognizable psychiatric injury”.  A damages award of $1,946,189.40 was upheld.  In this case, Justice Basten and Chief Justice Spigelman did not consider that vicarious liability for the Fire and Safety Officer should be imposed on the labour hire company.

The Lessons

a. Zero tolerance, its too expensive

b. Strong policy and processes

c. Buy in from leadership and the group as a whole

d. Continuous education around acceptable behaviour in a workplace

e. Education on appropriate ways of responding to situational events.

f. Deal with breaches swiftly and sometimes a commercial decision may need to be made

http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/cases/nsw/NSWCA/2007/377.html

Keep your thoughts positive, because you

Keep your thoughts positive, because your thoughts become your words.
Keep your words positive, because your words become your behavior.
Keep your behavior positive, because your behavior become your habits.
Keep your habits positive, because your habits become your values.
Keep your values positive, because your values become your destiny.
MAHATMA GANDHI
You want to change organisational culture, this is one way.
You want to change the world one word at a time.

Are Close strategies adequately covered in sales training?

training gary Tremolada frontline management experts

Many organisations train their team in sales, what they don’t train them to do is how to close clients in a way that adds value to the customer and the organisation.

It’s critical to have a sales process, e.g. SPIN, FOCUS, PREPARED, consultative and other interest based/value driven processes. You need to have solid product knowledge, a robust understanding of you FBA’s, case studies, testimonials and a solid understanding of your value proposition.

Ultimately, once you have identified the need/want/PAIN you need to be able to close. In other words, transitioning the potential customer into a paying one. Train the team in process then focus and rehearse closes until they’re second nature. Then its really about the activities/feedback loop required to meet the sales targets.

Learning and Development professionals when you’re sourcing a sales program one of the questions you want to be asking is, are closes covered and how much time is spent on them. Did the supplier define your objections/complaints? In other words, you will need to consult internally and define the common objections. Ensure that there is commitment from leadership otherwise the training is doomed to fail.

The other consideration is the sales peoples psychology which has a lot to do with how successful they are. Be careful of the bells and whistles that get sold with sales programs, which might be great but does not render any real sales value.

If your team wins, your organisation wins, your customer wins and you get to keep your job.

Will write over 50 closes that you can use over the next few weeks, stay tuned.

training gary Tremolada frontline management experts sales trainer

Forklift accident ends badly.


An employer was convicted and fined $80,000 plus costs after pleading guilty to a breach of s19(1) of the Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Act 1986. On 2 May 2011 a 52-year-old delivery driver sustained severe crush injuries when a 1.7 tonne machine fell from the tines of the forklift as it was being unloaded.

forklift Safety training Gary tremolada frontline management expert

The Lessons

  • Ensure that the driver was waiting in a designated safe area while his truck was being unloaded; and
  • Ensure that a tool box talk was carried out for the day or the specific job
  • Ensure that the employer forklift drivers would only unload the truck while the driver was waiting in the designated safe area and would cease unloading operations if the driver left that area; and
  • Ensure that the drivers understand and can apply the policy and procedure in the workplace.
  • Ensure that drivers upon entering the site reported to a designated induction area and were made aware of safety rules; and
  • Ensure that adequate signage of these rules was displayed so as to alert drivers of their existence.

When you do the basics this type of incident is less likely to occur. Frontline managers don’t assume people know what their doing. That is not to say that they can’t do their job, but some days people just have a bad day and unfortunately those days could be when injury or death occurs.

A pilot does a pre-flight check every single time, do you think they want to do it? Probably not. Its just to prevent that one day when they are not at their best or have things on their mind that everything is checked.

Perry v Custom Cartons Pty Ltd [2013] SAIRC 46

Hidden cost of conflict, there’s a formula?

Conflict in the workplace

We all know that conflict in workplaces cost money, yet we don’t know how to calculate it. Our legal system is full of cases with he said she said cases and there is a very definable cost, e.g. legal bills and not mention the emotional energy required to fight.

Dr Daniel Dana has formulated a potential formula that enables HR and L&D professionals to get some hard numbers to better make strategic and commercial decisions.

We have all had the experience of working with employers and or employees that don’t see eye to eye on occasions and sometimes not at all. When conflict sets in,(it’s a bit like a long cold bitter winter) it begins with covert conflict then escalating into overt conflict. Typically, at this point the damage to the organisation, its customers and its people is done. Customers leaving and its people leaving the organisation(really leaving the people).

Dr Dana identifies 8 areas of waste when it comes to conflict in the workplace listed below.

  1. Conflict wastes time
  2. Conflict reduces the quality of decisions
  3. Conflict increases attrition rates
  4. Conflict in restructuring workplaces and processes
  5. Conflict increases Sabotage, theft and damage
  6. Conflict lowers job motivation
  7. Conflict reduces efficiency in the workplace and
  8. Conflict increases health care cost

Most managers try to avoid getting in the middle of a conflict if they can help it and for good reason. The underlying premise is we are at work to get results for the organisation and in turn for ourselves in terms of remuneration. Once a manager steps in, not all the time but you are now dealing with the managers agenda as well as the others involved. That can be tricky.

If you get a valid number your speed of decision will be quicker, your commercial acumen will rise because suddenly now you can quantify the disruption. For HR, L&D and managers it’s a tremendous advantage. You can find more information on the below link.

http://www.mediationworks.com/restricted/DanaMeasure.pdf

People don’t leave organisation they leave the people in them pt7

garytremolada conflict managment and complaints handling awesome specialist expert ignoring12 indeagree

Superagreeable

Character traits, what they do

  1. Super unreliable, really can’t be counted on.
  2. They don’t like confrontation and don’t say no straight off would rather say yes in the moment but will call back and decide against it either through email or phone.

Handling them

  1. Dig for the unsaid reasons
  2. Talk through the options, best, likely and worst options
  3. They will need to made to feel safe
  4. Future pace the decisions.

How did a 19 year old become trapped in a harvester?

On 14 November 2011 a 19-year-old employee suffered crushing and laceration injuries when he became trapped in the powered rollers of a large potato harvesting machine. The moving parts of the harvester were exposed where it was possible for the employee to access moving parts when in operation.
Employer was convicted and fined $75,000 plus costs, after pleading guilty to a breach of s19(1) of the Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Act 1986. Pursuant to s60A, the magistrate also ordered the company to provide a copy of the judgement to each person currently employed on a permanent or casual basis.

Potato Harvestor

The Lesson:

  • Risk assess regardless if anyone has been hurt
  • Ensure you have proper inductions, tool box talks and supervision
  • Use “Management by wondering around” rather than relying on reports from the frontline and
  • Ensure that the engineering control effectively eliminates the possibility of injury.

Perry v Maranello Trading Pty Ltd [2013] SAIRC 53

https://frontlinemanagementexperts.wordpress.com/