Using a change model like ADKAR

ADKAR Model or the Prosci Model

adkar-for-scrum-adoption gary tremolada frontline management expert specialist leadership

The model dates back to James O. Prochaska who recognised that change occurs in multiple stages of learning from pre-contemplation through to action and reinforcement.The ADKAR model is a framework for understanding the dynamics of change at an individual level.  Using that understanding as a foundation, the model can be expanded to frame the change process within any type of organization.

The acronym ADKAR represents five elements: Awareness, Desire, Knowledge, Ability and Reinforcement.

 Awareness

In order to embrace a change, these key awareness components must be addressed:

  • What is the nature of the change, and how does the change align with the vision for the organization?
  • Why is the change is being made, and what are the risks of not changing?
  • How will the change impact our organization or community?
  • What’s in it for me?

As soon as individuals become aware of an impending change, they begin to look for answers to explain why change is needed. The awareness element also includes information about the internal and external drivers responsible for creating the need for change, and the motivation, or the “what’s in it for me” (WIFM). In a work setting, an employee may also question what is wrong with the current process or method — and what will happen if he or she doesn’t change.

It is important for the change sponsor to communicate the business need for the change, and explain the reason for the change.  The risk of not changing must also be communicated. In workplaces with a high degree of worker autonomy, these communications are critically important, otherwise, there is the potential for resistance to the change. Simply communicating the awareness components is not enough to ensure that people recognize the need for change.

ADKAR Influences, Results, and Change Tasks describes the factors of each element, typical resulting behaviors, and what tasks a change manager can perform to help ensure success.

Desire

Desire represents the motivation to support and participate in the change. Desire implies personal choice.  It is influenced by the nature of the change, the person’s unique situation with respect to the change, and intrinsic motivators that are unique to the person. Merely creating awareness does not create desire. If awareness is not accompanied by desire for change, critical resistance to change can occur.

ADKAR Influences, Results, and Change Tasks describes the factors of each element, typical resulting behaviors, and what tasks a change manager can perform to help ensure success.

Knowledge

Knowledge provides the information, training and education needed to know how to change. Depending upon the complexity and scope of a change, this can include information about behaviors, processes, tools, systems, skills, job roles and techniques that are needed to implement a change.

ADKAR Influences, Results, and Change Tasks describes the factors of each element, typical resulting behaviors, and what tasks a change manager can perform to help ensure success.

Ability

Ability is the demonstrated achievement of the change.  If one has ability, the change should be achievable — and measurable.

ADKAR Influences, Results, and Change Tasks describes the factors of each element, typical resulting behaviors, and what tasks a change manager can perform to help ensure success.

Reinforcement

Reinforcement is any event that strengthens and builds longevity for the change for an individual or an organization. This can include recognition, rewards, or celebrations of many types. Including reinforcement as part of the change process helps to ensure ongoing success with regard to the change, and can even increase the capacity for subsequent changes.

ADKAR Influences, Results, and Change Tasks describes the factors of each element, typical resulting behaviors, and what tasks a change manager can perform to help ensure success.

Your turn, as with any new technology the key is practice, practice and more practice.

Example here

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